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Hill Mynah

About Hill Mynah

This is a medium-sized bird with a chunky head and large, stout, orange bill. Mainly black with glossy purple and green sheen; broad white band on primaries. Orange-yellow bare skin and fleshy wattles on sides of head and nape. Dark brown eyes. Yellow legs.

The Hill Mynah breeds from April to July. They make a loose nest of twigs, grass, debris and feathers in tree holes up to 50 feet (15m) from the ground. They lay 2 pale grayish or greenish eggs, marked with brown, taken care of by both parents.

They are famous for their skill as a mimic when kept as a pet. They are very good at copying things that humans say. They actually talk more and are noiser than parrots.

The Hill Mynah is a relative of the starling that lives wild in the mountain forests of sourthern Asia.

Figs are a favorite food for this bird. It also tackles other fruits with large stones. It can devour a number of these in rapid succession, after which they regurgitate the stones, later helping to spread the seeds of the trees that it harvested. This bird may have the role of a plant pollinator.

They like to make a lot of noise when they leave their nests in the morning and when they return home at night. They fly from tree to tree like woodpeckers do.

Once they mate, these birds stay together for life, feeding and roosting together as well nesting and rearing their young.