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Dunnock

About Dunnock

An inconspicuous small bird, mainly reddish brown, streaked with black. Head, breast, and throat bluish-gray, except for brownish cheek patch and streaked brown, crown; narrow buff wing bar. Pinkish brown legs, blackish brown bill and brown eyes.

This bird has a variety of mating arrangements, from pairs to groups of males and females, formed in early spring. Their nest is a stout cup of twigs, stems, roots, dry leaves and moss lined with hair and wool. They have 3-6 blue eggs, taken care of by the female for 12-13 days.

This bird looks like a female sparrow. The Dunnock is one of the small family known as the accentors. This bird will creep beneath overhanging foliage with a jerky, mouse-like shuffle. Its retiring habits give no clue to its extraordinary mating systems, which can involve almost any combination of two or three or four males and females, and sometimes even more.